Hospitals and HUG Your Baby

Today’s hospitals face the often overwhelming task of providing evidence-based, Baby-Friendly and up-to-date discharge education for diverse maternity patients. HUG Your Baby is here to help!

Challenges facing today’s hospitals include:

  • Shortened hospital stays
  • Decreased attendance of patients at prenatal, breastfeeding, and childbirth classes
  • Diversity of patient education, culture and family constellation
  • Importance of HCAHPS scores (tied to Medicaid reimbursement) include:
      • Patient satisfaction survey after discharge
      • Assessment of staff’s ability “to explain things in a way that new parents understand” and to prepare mothers for care of self and baby after discharge

     

Benefits of HUG Your Baby Training and Resources:

  • Offers engaging, economical and efficient digital resources for staff and patients uploaded to your in-hospital training system
  • Provides multicultural, inclusive images
  • Helps staff more easily provide individualized postpartum and discharge education
  • Reinforces Baby-Friendly guidelines
  • Promotes breastfeeding duration
  • Uses family-friendly, accessible language to explain infant behavior
  • Provides research tools (and literature search) for evaluation of HUG Your Baby in your hospital
  • Likely to increase patient education,  HCAHPS scores, and reimbursement to hospital.

Designated as “Evidence-Based” by Healthy Start EPIC  Center. 

Components of HUG Your Baby for your Hospital (Choose one or all of The HUG training and resources):

Training for STAFF

  • Basic training for birth and early parenting professionals: Two-hour digital course combines information from HUG’s Helping Parents Understand their Newborn and the Roadmap to Breastfeeding Success online courses.  Designed specifically for a hospital or birth centers’ midwives, maternity nurses, childbirth educators, and lactation consultants. Birth, Breastfeeding & Beyond: Boosting Parent Confidence, Knowledge and Breastfeeding Duration in a Birth Facility offers:
    • Evidence-based course enhances the ability of birth professionals to help parents understand infant behavior; to prevent and solve problems around baby’s crying and sleeping; to promote breastfeeding duration; and to learn how upcoming child development will impact the breastfeeding experience
    • 2 CERPS or 2 Contact Hours credit
    • Click Birth, Breastfeeding and Beyond Outline of course

 

  • Certified HUG Teacher (CHT) training for staff who teach childbirth and breastfeeding education, and new parenting classes
    • Complete HUG Strategies digital course
      • two-hour course offers effective strategies to enhance communication with today’s young families
      • 2 CERPS or 2 Contact Hours credit
    •  Complete CHT documentation of parent teaching
      • approved for 6 Contact Hours credit
  • Hospital HUG Trainers (HHT) for clinical leaders wishing to champion the HUG program and provide program sustainability
    • Complete Certified HUG Teacher training
    • Attend 3-day HUG Your Baby Trainer Training
    • Obtain resources to promote and support HUG Your Baby in the hospital setting

Education for PARENTS

  • 20-minute parent education video can be uploaded to your hospital’s newborn channel or to patients’ tablets

 

  • HUG Your Baby and You! handout to help parents reflect on information seen in parent video in order to receive personalized teaching based on questions about THEIR newborn

  • Roadmap to Breastfeeding Success handout helps mothers at discharge anticipate how upcoming changes in baby’s development may impact their breastfeeding experience (birth to one year)

  • HUG E-Newsletters Series
    • Parents may register for this series at discharge
    • Continues information and video links about breastfeeding, and baby’s growth and development, over the next year
    • Newsletters arrive weekly for 12 weeks, then monthly until one year
    • Distributed by Constant Contact, a HIPPA-Certified newsletter distribution company
    • Click HERE to see sample E-Newsletter (for 2-week-old)
    • Click HERE to see sample E-Newsletter (for 4-month-old)

Research Results of Using HUG Your Baby (See bibliography below):

  • NICU fathers increased their knowledge of infant behavior.1
  • Postpartum mothers in a SCN (Special Care Nursery) demonstrated decreased maternal stress and increased maternal confidence.2
  • Student nurses increased their ability and confidence to: recognize infant behaviors, interpret those behaviors, and teach parents to respond appropriately to their infant.3
  • Childbirth educators, doulas and nurses reported that a HUG digital course offered important tools and strategies for teaching parents about newborn behavior.4
  • Breastfeeding peer counselors taking a HUG digital course demonstrated increased knowledge of how child development impacts breastfeeding, expressed a stronger intention to teach parents about normal child behavior, and reported greater confidence to do so.5

Other research on value of teaching about infant behavior (See bibliography below):

  • Teaching “Responsive Parenting”–the ability to read and respond appropriately to a baby’s body language and behaviors–reduces the BMI of children at one and three years old.6
  • Misinterpreting a baby’s normal behaviors, or viewing a baby as “not satisfied,” causes women to add formula, begin solids prematurely, or abandon breastfeeding altogether.7
  • Effective breastfeeding interventions are associated with increased breastfeeding rates.8
  • Teaching about newborn behavior and helping parents see the capabilities of infant increases mother-child interaction, parent confidence, and involvement of fathers.9
  • Video is an effective, efficient way to convey both patient education and continuing professional education content.10
  • Greater patient satisfaction is tied to hospital’s reimbursement and contributes to future use of that hospital’s services.11

Fees:

Because organizations vary in their financial resources, their educational goals, and the number of patients served, contact Jan Tedder at jan@hugyourbaby.org to plan a program to meet YOUR hospital’s specific needs.

Bibliography:

1Kadivar, M., Mozafarinia, M. (2013). Supporting fathers in a NICU: Effects of the HUG Your Baby program on father’s understanding of preterm infant behavior. Journal of Perinatal Education 22(2): 113-119.
2Hunter, L., Blake, S., Simmons, C. & Derouin, A. (2018). Implementing a parent education program in the Special Care Nursery. Journal of Pediatric Health Care XX, 1-7.
3Alden, K. (2018). A Web-based Module to Enhance BSN Students’ Knowledge and Confidence in Teaching Parents about Newborn Behavior. Journal of Perinatal Education 27(2), 104-114.
4Tedder, J. (2012). Teaching for Birth and Beyond: Online program incorporated into a birthing and parenting certification. International Journal of Childbirth Education 27(3): 65-68.
5Tedder, J. & Quintana, E. (2108). Online education for WIC professionals: Teaching child development to extend breastfeeding duration. Clinical Lactation 9(3), 108-118.
6Brown, A. & Arnott, B. (2014). Breastfeeding Duration and Early Parenting Behaviour: The Importance of an Infant-Led, Responsive Style. PLoS One 9(2),e83893.
7Li, R., Fein, S., Chen, J., Grummer-Strawn, L. (2008). Why mothers stop breastfeeding: Mothers’ self-reported reasons for stopping during the first year. Pediatrics 122:S69-76.]
8Patnode, C., Henninger, M., Senger, C., Perdue, L. & Whitlock, E. (2016). Interventions to support breastfeeding: Updated evidence report and systematic review for the US Preventive Services Task Force. Journal of American Medical Association. 316(16):1694-1705.
9Nugent, K., Keefer, C., Minear, S., Johnson, L. (2007). Understanding newborn behavior and early relationships: The Newborn Behavioral Observation System Handbook. Baltimore: Paul H Brookes Pub Co.
10Koch, L. F. (2014). The nursing educator’s role in e-learning: A literature review. Nurse Education Today, 34(2014), 1382–1387.
11Wagner, D. & Washington,C. (2015). Patient education with postpartum teaching methods. Journal of Perinatal Education, 25(2), 129–136.